Quiz
How Much Do You Know About Skin Cancer?
Skin cancer is the most common cancer in the United States, affecting more than 5 million people each year. Despite its prevalence, it’s a disease that’s not well understood by many.
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What is the most common form of skin cancer?
That’s incorrect. Basal cell carcinoma is the most common form of skin cancer, with more than 3.6 million cases diagnosed in the U.S. each year.
You’re right. About 3.6 million cases of basal cell carcinoma are diagnosed in the U.S. each year.
That’s incorrect. Basal cell carcinoma is the most common form of skin cancer, with more than 3.6 million cases diagnosed in the U.S. each year.
That’s incorrect. Basal cell carcinoma is the most common form of skin cancer, with more than 3.6 million cases diagnosed in the U.S. each year.
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True or false: If you have a family history of melanoma, you are at greater risk for developing the disease.
That’s correct. Heredity plays a major role in melanoma. About one in every 10 patients diagnosed with the disease has a family member with a history of melanoma.
Heredity plays a major role in melanoma. About one in every 10 patients diagnosed with the disease has a family member with a history of melanoma.
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True or false: Skin cancer is found only on areas of your body which are exposed to the sun?
While most skin cancers occur on parts of the body excessively exposed to the sun — especially the face, ears, neck, scalp, shoulders and back – tumors can also develop on unexposed areas; these areas may include, but are not limited to, the soles of your feet, genitals and even your mucous membranes.
You’re right. Skin cancers may develop on unexposed areas of the body, including the soles of your feet, genitals and even on your mucous membranes.
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Which of the sun’s rays cause skin cancer?
Both UVA and UVB rays penetrate the atmosphere and play an important role in conditions such as premature skin aging, eye damage and skin cancers.
Both UVA and UVB rays penetrate the atmosphere and play an important role in conditions such as premature skin aging, eye damage and skin cancers.
Great job, you’re right. Both UVA and UVB rays penetrate the atmosphere and play an important role in conditions such as premature skin aging, eye damage and skin cancers.
Both UVA and UVB rays penetrate the atmosphere and play an important role in conditions such as premature skin aging, eye damage and skin cancers.
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What is SPF?
Your answer is correct! SPF – or Sun Protection Factor – is a measure of a sunscreen’s ability to prevent UVB from damaging the skin. Here’s how it works: If it takes 20 minutes for your unprotected skin to start turning red, using an SPF 15 sunscreen theoretically prevents reddening 15 times longer – about five hours. However, in reality, sunscreen wears away and loses strength after a while in the sun, so you need to reapply at least every couple of hours, and immediately after sweating or swimming.
That’s not right. SPF – or Sun Protection Factor – is a measure of a sunscreen’s ability to prevent UVB from damaging the skin. Here’s how it works: If it takes 20 minutes for your unprotected skin to start turning red, using an SPF 15 sunscreen theoretically prevents reddening 15 times longer – about five hours. However, in reality, sunscreen wears away and loses strength after a while in the sun, so you need to reapply at least every couple of hours, and immediately after sweating or swimming.
That’s not right. SPF – or Sun Protection Factor – is a measure of a sunscreen’s ability to prevent UVB from damaging the skin. Here’s how it works: If it takes 20 minutes for your unprotected skin to start turning red, using an SPF 15 sunscreen theoretically prevents reddening 15 times longer – about five hours. However, in reality, sunscreen wears away and loses strength after a while in the sun, so you need to reapply at least every couple of hours, and immediately after sweating or swimming.
That’s not right. SPF – or Sun Protection Factor – is a measure of a sunscreen’s ability to prevent UVB from damaging the skin. Here’s how it works: If it takes 20 minutes for your unprotected skin to start turning red, using an SPF 15 sunscreen theoretically prevents reddening 15 times longer – about five hours. However, in reality, sunscreen wears away and loses strength after a while in the sun, so you need to reapply at least every couple of hours, and immediately after sweating or swimming.
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True or false: People who first use a tanning bed before age 35 increase their risk for melanoma by 75 percent.
You’re right, this alarming statistic is indeed true. In addition to having an increased risk for melanoma, those who use tanning beds are also at greater risk for basal cell carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma.
Unfortunately, this alarming statistic is true. In addition to having an increased risk for melanoma, those who use tanning beds are also at greater risk for basal cell carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma.
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Complete the following sentence: “Infants under the age of six months….”
Nice work – you’re right. Because infants’ skin is so sensitive, it’s better in the first six months to keep them out of the sun rather than use sunscreen. It’s especially important to avoid direct sun exposure and seek the shade during the sun’s hours of greatest intensity, between 10 AM and 4 PM. Keep to the shady side of the street on walks, and use the sun shield on your stroller.
Incorrect. Because infants’ skin is so sensitive, it’s better in the first six months to shield them from the sun rather than use sunscreen. It’s especially important to avoid direct sun exposure and seek the shade during the sun’s hours of greatest intensity, between 10 AM and 4 PM. Keep to the shady side of the street on walks, and use the sun shield on your stroller.
Incorrect. Because infants’ skin is so sensitive, it’s better in the first six months to shield them from the sun rather than use sunscreen. It’s especially important to avoid direct sun exposure and seek the shade during the sun’s hours of greatest intensity, between 10 AM and 4 PM. Keep to the shady side of the street on walks, and use the sun shield on your stroller.
Incorrect. Because infants’ skin is so sensitive, it’s better in the first six months to shield them from the sun rather than use sunscreen. It’s especially important to avoid direct sun exposure and seek the shade during the sun’s hours of greatest intensity, between 10 AM and 4 PM. Keep to the shady side of the street on walks, and use the sun shield on your stroller.
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Which of the following celebrities passed away from melanoma?
You’re right. The legendary singer, musician and songwriter died of melanoma in 1981 when he was only 36.
That’s not correct; the answer is actually Bob Marley. The legendary singer, musician and songwriter died of melanoma in 1981 when he was only 36.
That’s not correct; the answer is actually Bob Marley. The legendary singer, musician and songwriter died of melanoma in 1981 when he was only 36.
That’s not correct; the answer is actually Bob Marley. The legendary singer, musician and songwriter died of melanoma in 1981 when he was only 36.
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True or false: One in five Americans will be diagnosed with skin cancer by the age of 70.
You’re right. This statistic is unfortunately true. Skin cancer is the most common cancer in the United States.
Sadly, this statistic is true. Skin cancer is the most common cancer in the United States.
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What can be done to help prevent skin cancer?
This was a tricky one. While these are all great sun protection strategies, we recommend a complete sun protection regimen that incorporates all of the above strategies.
This was a tricky one. While these are all great sun protection strategies, we recommend a complete sun protection regimen that incorporates all of the above strategies.
This was a tricky one. While these are all great sun protection strategies, we recommend a complete sun protection regimen that incorporates all of the above strategies.
This was a tricky one. While these are all great sun protection strategies, we recommend a complete sun protection regimen that incorporates all of the above strategies.
You know how to protect your skin – you’re right! We sure hope you’re taking these steps every day (even when it’s cloudy outside, since the sun’s rays penetrate clouds and fog). You’ll want to use a broad-spectrum sunscreen with an SPF 30 or higher when spending extended time outdoors. And also regularly monitor your skin with the help of mapping and doctor visits.
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It seems that you know very little about skin cancer! Our skin is the largest organ of the body, and skin cancer is the only cancer we can see. Do not neglect the safety of your skin!
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Well, your knowledge is sketchy, but it still exists. Our skin is the largest organ of the body, and skin cancer is the only cancer we can see. Do not neglect the safety of your skin!
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Impressive result, keep it up! Our skin is the largest organ of the body, and skin cancer is the only cancer we can see. Do not neglect the safety of your skin!
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List of literature

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7) Vajdic CM, Chong AH, Kelly PJ, Meagher NS, Van Leeuwen MT, Grulich AE, Webster AC.

Survival after cutaneous melanoma in kidney transplant recipients: a population–based matched cohort study. Am J Transplant. 2014 Jun;14(6):1368–75. doi: 10.1111/ajt.12716. Epub 2014 Apr 14.


8) Risk of melanoma in people with HIV/AIDS in the pre– and post–HAART eras: a systematic review and meta–analysis of cohort studies. Olsen CM, Knight LL, Green AC. PLoS One. 2014 Apr 16;9(4):e95096. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0095096. eCollection 2014. Review.


9) Kraemer KH, Lee MM, Scotto J. Xeroderma pigmentosum. Cutaneous, ocular, and neurologic abnormalities in 830 published cases. Arch Dermatol. 1987 Feb;123(2):241–50.


10) Udayakumar D, Tsao H. Melanoma genetics: an update on risk–associated genes. Hematol Oncol Clin North Am. 2009; 23:415–429. vii. [PubMed: 19464594] Authors review genes of variable risk implicated in CMM, most notably CDKN2A.


11) Pappo AS, Armstrong GT, Liu W, et al. Melanoma as a subsequent neoplasm in adult survivors of childhood cancer: A report from the childhood cancer survivor study. Pediatr Blood Cancer. 2012


12) Indoor tanning and risk of melanoma: a case–control study in a highly exposed population.

Lazovich D1, Vogel RI, Berwick M, Weinstock MA, Anderson KE, Warshaw EM. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2010 Jun;19(6):1557–68. doi: 10.1158/1055–9965.EPI–09–1249. Epub 2010 May 26.